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Adolescent Vaccination Campaigns

“Got Vaxed?” The need to protect our children doesn’t end when they enter kindergarten.  Many adolescents are susceptible to vaccine-preventable diseases, including varicella, hepatitis B, Human Papillomavirus (HPV), flu, meningococcal, and pertussis.  To improve vaccination coverage and increase immunization awareness among adolescents, the Utah Immunization Program has developed an adolescent immunization campaign, “Got Vaxed?”.  Campaign materials are available to the public and private immunization providers and include a teen immunization brochure (available online only) and two posters. 

“Vaccinate Before You Graduate” It is widely recognized that childhood vaccination programs and school entry requirements are effective public health tools for preventing vaccine preventable diseases and improving childhood immunization rates.  However, Utah school immunization law does not require that adolescents receive all vaccines currently recommended for children 11-19 years of age.  Many Utah adolescents are not adequately immunized and may be at risk for diseases such as Meningitis, Human Papillomavirus (HPV), or Pertussis.
 
In conjunction with nationwide efforts to address adolescent immunization, the Utah Immunization Program developed a school-based adolescent immunization program entitled, “Vaccinate Before You Graduate.”  This program provides educational materials and resources for parents and teens in Utah middle and high schools to emphasize the importance of vaccinating teens before graduating from school.  Available print materials include a poster and brochure.
 
Utah middle and high schools may order the poster any time during the school year.  The brochure is available online only.  These materials can be displayed in student counseling centers; libraries; book shelves in the halls; distributed during registration or parent/teacher conferences; sent home with students; or included in registration packets.  The “Vaccinate Before You Graduate” program is modeled after a similar initiative developed by the Rhode Island Department of Health.